Lesson 4 How Does One Get to the Bus Station?

Lesson 4 Conversation and Initial Training


Listen to the following conversation between Bob Turner and a passerby.

Bob: Mama, maaari po bang magtanong?
(Mister, may I ask a question?)

Tao : Oo, puwede. Ano iyon?
(Yes, you can. What is it?)

Bob: Paano po ba ang pagpunta sa istasyon ng bus?
(How does one get to the bus station?)

Tao: Sa kantong ito, kumanan ka. Dumeretso ka hanggang sa Rizal Avenue. Sa kaliwa mo, makikita mo ang istasyon ng bus.
(At this corner, turn right. Go straight ahead to Rizal Avenue. On your left, you’ll see the bus station.)

Bob: Hindi ko po naiintindihan. Pakiulit po ninyo.
(I didn’t understand. Please repeat, sir.)

Tao: Sa kantong ito, kumanan ka. Dumeretso ka hanggang sa Rizal Avenue. Sa kaliwa mo, makikita mo ang istasyon ng bus.
(At this corner, turn right. Go straight ahead as far as Rizal Avenue. On your left, you’ll see the bus station.)

Bob: Gaano kalayo rito ang istasyon?
(How far from here is the station?)

Tao: Mga sampung minuto sa dyip. Mabuti pa magdyip ka.
(About 10 minutes by jeepney. It would be better to take the jeepney.)

Bob: Marami pong salamat sa tulong ninyo.
(Thank you very much for your help.)

Tao: Walang anuman.
(Don’t mention it. or It’s nothing)

Now let’s practice speaking.

On the street, Bob asks a man for directions to the bus station. To address a man whose name you don’t know you use, “mama“. Be very careful how you pronounce this word. The stress is on the first syllable. The mark over the second “a” indicates that the vowel is cut short or stopped (which is known as a ‘glottal stop’)

Listen

Mama

REPEAT

Mama
Mama

Maari po bang magtanong?

Magtanong” means “to ask a question”.

Magtanong
Magtanong

“May I..” is “maaari po bang..”

REPEAT

Maaari po bang..
Maaari po bang..

Maaari po bang magtanong?
Maaari po bang magtanong?

Mama, maaari po bang magatanong?

The man answers,

Oo, puwede, ano iyon?

Puwede” and “maaari” mean “can” or “may”.

REPEAT

Oo, puwede
Oo, puwede

Ano iyon?” is “What is it?”

REPEAT

Ano iyon?
Ano iyon?

Oo, puwede. Ano iyon?
Oo, puwede. Ano iyon?

Bob asks how to get to the bus station.

Listen

Paano po ba ang pagpunta sa istasyon ng bus?

REPEAT

sa istasyon ng bus
sa istasyon ng bus

ang pagpunta

ang pagpunta sa istasyon ng bus
ang pagpunta sa istasyon ng bus

paano po ba
paano po ba

Paano po ba ang pagpunta sa istasyon ng bus?
Paano po ba ang pagpunta sa istasyon ng bus?

The man replies:

Sa kantong ito, kumanan ka. Dumeretso ka hanggang sa Rizal Avenue. Sa kaliwa mo, makikita mo ang istasyon ng bus.

Bob says that he doesn’t understand.

Hindi ko po naiintindihan.

REPEAT

naiintindihan
naiintindihan

Hindi ko po naiintindihan.
Hindi ko po naiintindihan.

“Please repeat” is “pakiulit

REPEAT

paki” is the prefix used for politeness. It is equivalent to “please”.

REPEAT

Pakiulit
Pakiulit

Pakiulit po ninyo
Pakiulit po ninyo

Hindi ko po naiintindihan.
Hindi ko po naiintindihan.

Hindi ko po naiintindihan. Pakiulit po ninyo.
Hindi ko po naiintindihan. Pakiulit po ninyo.

The man speaks a little slower this time.

Listen.

Sa kantong ito, kumanan ka.

Sa kantong ito” is “at this corner”

REPEAT

sa kantong ito
sa kantong ito

kumanan ka” means “turn right”

REPEAT

kumanan ka
kumanan ka

Sa kantong ito, kumanan ka.
Sa kantong ito, kumanan ka.

The man continues…

Dumeretso ka hanggang sa Rizal Avenue.

Dumeretso ka” is “go straight ahead”

REPEAT

Dumeretso ka
Dumeretso ka

Hanggang sa” means “as far as” or “until”

REPEAT

hanggang sa Rizal Avenue
hanggang sa Rizal Avenue

Dumeretso ka hanggang sa Rizal Avenue.
Dumeretso ka hanggang sa Rizal Avenue.

The man then tells Bob that he will see the bus station on his left.

Sa kaliwa mo, makikita mo ang istasyon ng bus.

kaliwa” is “left”

Sa kaliwa mo” is “on your left”

REPEAT

Sa kaliwa mo
Sa kaliwa mo

Makikita” means “will be able to see”

REPEAT

Makikita
Makikita

Makikita mo
Makikita mo

Sa kaliwa mo, makikita mo ang istasyon ng bus.
Sa kaliwa mo, makikita mo ang istasyon ng bus.

Bob then asks how far the station is.

Gaano kalayo rito ang istasyon?

REPEAT

Gaano kalayo rito
Gaano kalayo rito

ang istasyon
ang istasyon

Gaano kalayo rito ang istasyon?
Gaano kalayo rito ang istasyon?

The man says “About 10 minutes by jeepney.”

Mga sampung minuto sa dyip.

It is very common for Filipinos to give distances in terms of time. Since that’s a little far, the man goes on to say, “it would be better to take a jeepney.”

Mabuti pa magdyip ka.

REPEAT

magdyip ka
magdyip ka

mabuti pa” literally means “better yet”

mabuti pa
mabuti pa magdyip ka

Bob Turner thanks the man for his help.

Maraming pong salamat sa tulong ninyo.
Maraming pong salamat sa tulong ninyo.

sa tulong ninyo” is “for your help”

REPEAT

sa tulong ninyo
sa tulong ninyo

Maraming pong salamat” means “thank you very much”

REPEAT

Maraming pong salamat
Maraming pong salamat

Maraming pong salamat sa tulong ninyo.
Maraming pong salamat sa tulong ninyo.

The man answers…

Walang anuman

REPEAT

walang anuman
walang anuman

Now you will hear the conversation again. Repeat during the pause and imitate the speaker as closely as you can.

Mama, maaari po bang magtanong?

Oo, puwede. Ano iyon?

Paano po ba ang pagpunta sa istasyon ng bus?

Sa kantong ito, kumanan ka. Dumeretso ka hanggang sa Rizal Avenue. Sa kaliwa mo, makikita mo ang istasyon ng bus.

Hindi ko po naiintindihan. Pakiulit po ninyo.

Sa kantong ito, kumanan ka. Dumeretso ka hanggang sa Rizal Avenue. Sa kaliwa mo, makikita mo ang istasyon ng bus.

Gaano kalayo rito ang istasyon?

Mga sampung minuto sa dyip. Mabuti pa magdyip ka.

Marami pong salamat sa tulong ninyo.

Walang anuman.

Alan’s Notes on the Conversation:

Mama is a polite term used to address a man whose name you don’t know. Notice that the second “a” is cut short or stopped. It is similar to the “uh” in “Uh-oh”, in terms of how it is cut off abruptly. It is known as a glottal stop.

Maaari is sometimes used instead of puwede. Both mean “can” or “may.”

Kantong is kanto (“corner”) plus the linker -ng.

Makikita: future of makita, “to see”, thus it means “will see”.

Mo is “you” or “your.” Sa kaliwa mo, “On your left”; Makikita mo…, “You will see … ” (will-see by-you)

Pakiulit is paki (prefix for polite request) and ulit (“repeat”), “Please, repeat.”

Hanggang means “until,” “as far as,” or “to.” Hanggang bukas, “until tomorrow,” is commonly used when parting from someone you expect to see the next day.

Dyip (“jeepney”) is an ornately decorated, elongated jeep used as a jitney. The English term “jitney” is an informal term dating from the early part of the 1900’s that means “a bus or other vehicle carrying passengers for a low fare.” (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jitney) In the Philippines the word is instead pronounced “jeepney” since they were originally created from Jeeps and other military trucks left by the Americans after World War II.

Jeepneys have routes like buses, but, except in Manila, they do not have regular stops; the driver will stop whenever requested.
To request the driver to stopy, you just say Para po!.

The destination is painted on the side or using a sign on the front window. In some places the jeepneys are also color and number coded.

Magdyip means “to take a jeepney.”  Mag- is a very useful prefix. You can put it in front of many English words and you will be understood. For example, mag-shopping (go shopping); mag-swimming (go swimming), etc.

Mag added to a noun changes it to a verb; for example, asawa – “spouse”; mag-asawa – lito get married.”

Mag is often used with foreign words: magsweater – “to put on/wear a sweater”; magbus – “to take/ride a bus.”

PRONOUNS
One pronoun in Tagalog may have several meanings in English, as you saw in the examples “Sa kaliwa mo“, on your left,” and “Makikita mo“, “you will see.”

Different pronouns in Tagalog may have only one English equivalent; for example, asawa ko and aking asawa both mean “my spouse.”

Every pronoun in tagalog has three forms, classified as the ang, ng, and sa forms.

The form of the pronoun often depends on its position in the sentence.

As you know, ang in front of a noun marks it as the topic of a sentence, so the pronouns that are used as topics are called the ang forms.

Examples:
I (ako)
Tatlong buwan na ako rito. (I’ve been here three months now.)

The subject is “ako” (I).

KA / IKAW:  You, singular.
Kumusta ka? (How are you?)

KAMI: We; I and others, but not the person(s) being spoken to (kami)
Hindi kami makapagtatagal. (We can’t stay longer.)

TAYO:  We, I, you and others, including the person(s) being spoken to (tayo)
Magkita tayong muli. (We will see each other again.)

KAYO:  You, plural or formal singular
Saan kayo nakatira? (Where do you (pl.) live?)

THE NG FORM of Pronouns
These pronouns may correspond to the English possessive pronouns or adjectives, as well as subject or object pronouns.

Examples:
KO: I, my, me
Ito si Anne, maybahay ko. (This is Anne, my wife)

Gusto ko ang Pilipinas. (I like the Philippines. Literally, Liked by-me the Philippines.)

MO: You, your
Gusto mo ba ang Pilipinas? (Do you like the Philippines?)
…. sa kaliwa mo (on your left)

NAMIN: We, our, us  (excluding the person spoken to)
Nakatira sa Olongapo ang kaibigan namin, si Pedro.
(Our friend Pedro lives in Olongapo.)
In this case, the word “our” (namin) does not include the person being spoken to.

NATIN: We, our, us (including the person spoken to)
… ang kaibigan natin, si Pedro
(… our friend, Pedro)
The word “our” (natin) includes the person spoken to.

NINYO: You, your (plural)
Gusto ba ninyo ang Pilipinas? (Do you like the Philippines?)
Ninyo” is similar to “mo” but is used for more than one person.
It can also be used when speaking to one person formally, to show respect.

Anak na lalaki ba ninyo ito? (Is this your son?) (Child <linker> male <question marker> your this)

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